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Home Improvement Activity Increases During COVID-19

Research Show 57 Percent of Homeowners Find Time for Home Improvement Projects

According the latest U.S. Census Bureau report, home centers, hardware stores, garden centers and building materials suppliers realized a year-over-year sales increase of 22.6 percent, leading all retail categories except for online purchases. This continues a trend with retailers serving the home improvement market that suggests homeowners are doing projects during the pandemic. Recent research from Consumer Specialists and the Home Projects Council examines why 57 percent of homeowners put an emphasis on home improvement during the first three months of COVID-19.

“Even with people at home more than usual, we were surprised at just how many ways COVID-19 has impacted home improvement activity,” said Fred Miller, president of Consumer Specialists. “In terms of consumer attitudes and behavior, there has never been a single force that has so significantly sell my house fast jacksonville shaped the home improvement

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Coronavirus Concerns Spark New Home Design Ideas

Cindy Kosloski, Home Builders Association of Greater Lansing
Published 3:10 p.m. ET July 16, 2020

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Homeowners have transformed their living spaces into classrooms, home offices and gyms this year. With people spending more time at home, the future of home design is being reimagined. As homeowners seek out ways to maximize the functionality their living spaces, here are some of the budding trends in home design and renovation.

Modifying Mudrooms and Entryways

A simple area to take off jackets or rainboots when entering your home is no longer an afterthought. Now a focal point, home entryways and mudrooms are a space where mail is dropped off, groceries/delivery boxes are collected, face coverings are removed, or hands are sanitized. Future home design will take these activities in consideration when creating a functional, cohesive and

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iPadOS 14 hands-on: Design updates galore

That really shouldn’t be much of a surprise. Apple has been encouraging developers to build iPad apps with Mac Catalyst, which ensures that the same code runs on Mac computers as well as tablets. In other words, some iPad apps are essentially Mac apps, so a little cultural crossover was inevitable. What makes this particular situation more interesting, though, is the fact that none of the redesigned apps I mentioned are built on Catalyst — Apple just felt that merging some historically desktop-y elements into its mobile software was the right way forward. Now, the company may just be applying best practices from one platform to another, and I have to admit that these sidebars make using a trackpad or mouse with these apps easier. Still, when you consider these design changes and the fact that some parts of macOS Big Sur took clear inspiration from iOS, it’s hard

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How will COVID-19 change home design? Architect shares thoughts

MANILA — An architect recently shared his thoughts on how residences can accommodate the demands of the “new normal” caused by the novel coronavirus pandemic.

In a recent forum organized by Enderun Colleges, Gelo Mañosa listed six “post-COVID world changes in residential architecture,” noting that COVID-19 has forced people to rethink the way they live.

1. TRADITIONAL OVER OPEN SPACES

Mañosa sees a return to traditional floor plans as opposed to the currently trendy open spaces, given the growing need for dedicated areas for work and other activities.

“The open floor plan which was pretty much celebrated and combined the living room, dining room, kitchen, and other parts of the house will change. Open planning will prove to be a hindrance for a home that shares things like office spaces, learning spaces for the kids, and entertainment spaces,” he said.

“A good example would be, ‘Dad’s home office can’t really

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